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Painting

Hieronymus Bosch, "The seven deadly sins and the four last things."

Hieronymus Bosch

1080 921 Lines & Marks

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Hieronymus Bosch (1450 – 1516) was an Early Netherlandish painter. His work is known for its fantastic imagery, detailed landscapes, and illustrations of religious concepts and narratives. Within his lifetime his work was collected in the Netherlands, Austria, and Spain, and widely copied, especially his macabre and nightmarish depictions of hell…

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Hieronymus Bosch, “The Garden of Earthly Delights.”

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Bosch painted in a comparatively sketchy manner, contrasting with the traditional Flemish style of painting in which the smooth surface—achieved by the application of multiple transparent glazes—conceals the brushwork. Bosch’s paintings with their rough surfaces, so called impasto painting, differed from the tradition of the great Netherlandish painters of the end of the 15th, and beginning of the 16th centuries, who wished to hide the work done and so suggest their paintings as more nearly divine creations. (wiki)

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Right side: Painting, Detail, “Garden of Earthly delights”  |  Left side: Drawing, “The Tree man.”

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Hieronymus Bosch, “The seven deadly sins and the four last things.”

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Documentary: Hieronymus Bosch with Brian Sewell

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row lk_dm=”0″ lk_thm=”0″ lk_tuo=”0″ lk_dt=” “][vc_column][grve_icon_box icon_size=”small” align=”center” icon_animation=”yes” icon=”copyright” icon_color=”blue” title=”Copyright Information” text_style=”subtitle” animation=”fadeInLeft” animation_delay=”50″]The images on this page are not authored by Lines & Marks. They are shared under “fair use” for non-profit, educational and reference purposes, and may be subject to copyright. If for any reason this status is contested, notify us and we will remove the image(s) immediately. All other, © Lines & Marks, 2015. [/grve_icon_box][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Karl Friedrich Schinkel,"Der Brand von Moskau, 1812/1813"

Karl Friedrich Schinkel

762 571 Lines & Marks

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Karl Friedrich Schinkel,”Allegorie auf Beuth, den Pegasus reitend,” 1837. Watercolor. 37,4 x 35,9 cm

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Karl Friedrich Schinkel (13 March 1781 – 9 October 1841) was a Prussian architect, city planner, and painter who also designed furniture and stage sets. Schinkel was one of the most prominent architects of Germany and designed both neoclassical and neogothic buildings. Schinkel’s style, in his most productive period, is defined by a turn to Greek rather than Imperial Roman architecture, an attempt to turn away from the style that was linked to the recent French occupiers. (Thus, he is a noted proponent of the Greek Revival.) His most famous extant buildings are found in and around Berlin. (wiki)

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Later, Schinkel moved away from classicism altogether, embracing the Neo-Gothic in his Friedrichswerder Church (1824–1831). Schinkel’s Bauakademie (1832–1836), his most innovative building, eschewed historicist conventions and seemed to point the way to a clean-lined “modernist” architecture that would become prominent in Germany only toward the beginning of the 20th century. (wiki)

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 Karl Friederich Schinkel, “The Gate in the Rocks,” 1818. Oil on canvas. 29.1 x 18.9 in

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row lk_dm=”0″ lk_thm=”0″ lk_tuo=”0″ lk_dt=” “][vc_column][grve_icon_box icon_size=”small” align=”center” icon_animation=”yes” icon=”copyright” icon_color=”blue” title=”Copyright Information” text_style=”subtitle” animation=”fadeInLeft” animation_delay=”50″]The images on this page are not authored by Lines & Marks. They are shared under “fair use” for non-profit, educational and reference purposes, and may be subject to copyright. If for any reason this status is contested, notify us and we will remove the image(s) immediately. All other, © Lines & Marks, 2015. [/grve_icon_box][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Albrecht Dürer, "Young Hare." (1502)

Albrecht Durer

800 884 Lines & Marks

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Vincent van Gogh, "Wheat Field with Cypresses"

Vincent Van Gogh

1080 822 Lines & Marks

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[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text animation_delay=”200″]”Generally overshadowed by the fame and familiarity of his paintings, Vincent van Gogh’s more than 1,100 drawings remain comparatively unknown, although they are among his most ingenious and striking creations. Van Gogh engaged drawing and painting in a rich dialogue, which enabled him to fully realize the creative potential of both means of expression.