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Lines & Marks

Blu | MUTO – Wall Painted Animation

1080 734 Lines & Marks

[vc_row seperator_indeed_locker=”” lk_t=”ism_template_1″ lk_io=”default” lk_dm=”0″ lk_thm=”0″ lk_tuo=”0″ section_id=”start”][vc_column][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]A short street-art film by Blu. An ambiguous animation painted on public walls. Made in Buenos Aires and in Baden (fantoche).

blublu.org
Music by Andrea Martignoni
Produced by Mercurio Film
Assistant: Sibe

Blu is the pseudonym of an Italian artist who conceals his real identity. He was born in Senigallia. He lives in Bologna and has been active in street art since 1999. Blu’s fame began in 1999, thanks to a series of illicit graffiti painted in the historical center and suburbs of Bologna, the capital of Italy’s Emilia-Romagna region. In the early years of his career his technique was limited to the use of spray paint, the typical medium of graffiti culture. His characteristic style appeared in 2001, however, when Blu started painting with house paint, using rollers mounted on top of telescopic sticks. This new solution allowed him to increase the painted surface area and convey a stronger intensity to his visual vocabulary. Huge human figures, sometimes sarcastic, sometimes dramatic, who looked as if they were borrowed from comics or arcade games, began appearing along the streets of Bologna around this time. (wiki)[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Hideki Inaba ( 稲葉 秀樹 ) | “Slowly Rising”

1080 616 Lines & Marks

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“Slowly Rising,” directed by Hideki Inaba is the official music video for BEATSOFREEN. Hideki Inaba was born in 1988 and is from Tokyo, Japan. He favorite pastime, besides making animation is insect collecting.

Header video is called, “hadopelagic” and can be found on his vimeo page.

“‘Slowly Rising’ suggested to me the image of the sun. A seed was born beneath the sun, the source of all existence. The seed absorbed the light. It created more seeds like itself, gradually increasing in number. Time passed, but still their numbers slowly continued to rise, and before long they were quietly swallowed up by their own shadows. After everything that had lived had perished, nothing but an empty world remained. There, once again, an environment where the next living things could grow silently began to spread.” — Hideki Inaba

Hideki Inaba
vimeo.com/kanahebi
tumblr.com/blog/kanahebi1783

“Slowly Rising” was mastered by Matthewdavid
www.leavingrecords.com

More from Beatsofreen
soundcloud.com/beatsofreen
kingdeluxe.ca/beatsofreen

“Slowly Rising” is included in album Full Circle by King Deluxe
kingdeluxe.ca
vimeo.com/channels/kingdeluxe[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

James Gillray, "The Plumb Pudding in Danger."

The Secret of Drawing | Ep.2, Storylines

971 715 Lines & Marks

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“][vc_column width=”1/1″ desktop_hide=”” tablet_width=”” tablet_sm_width=”” mobile_width=””][vc_column_text animation_delay=”200″]This four part BBC series, presented by Andrew Graham-Dixon, explores how drawing has shaped our lives.

Storylines
Season 1 | Episode 2
Aired date: 

Episode 2 – Storylines
Andrew Graham-Dixon examines the variety of ways in which drawing has been used throughout the centuries to tell narrative stories, many of them dark or satirical, from animation to Japanese manga books. Political cartoonist Martin Rowson explains how his savage commentaries on contemporary politicians are influenced by 19th century masters Hogarth and Gillray, and in a rare interview the American comic strip artist Daniel Clowes talks about what inspired his celebrated graphic novel Ghost World. Also covered is Manga artist Misako Rocks!, Hollywood storyboard artist, J. Todd Anderson, early animator, Winsor McCay and French animator Sylvain Chomet.

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The Secret of Drawing Series is the property of the BBC and is subject to copyright. Header video is the work of SI Scott.

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Drew Tyndell | “California Inspires Me: Reggie Watts”

1080 634 Lines & Marks

“California Inspires Me is a collaboration between Google Play and California Sunday Magazine.”

Animation by Drew Tyndell
Music by Shannon Ferguson
Sound Production by Mooj Zadie
Special Thanks to Kevin Ferguson

Seth Boyden | “An Object at Rest”

947 528 Lines & Marks

“An Object at Rest” follows the life of a stone as it travels over the course of millennia, facing nature’s greatest obstacle: human civilization. Seth Boyden on Vimeo | Blog | Online Sketchbook

“Cave of Forgotten Dreams” | Werner Herzog

600 330 Lines & Marks

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“Maybe they in the future will find other caves with even older paintings and evidence of human and artistic work. But this is the first evidence of the modern human soul.”

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Chauvet Cave, from “Cave of Forgotten Dreams” by Werner Herzog (2010)

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Official Trailer for Werner Herzog’s “Cave of Forgotten Dreams.” (2010)

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Introduction to the Cave Art Paintings of the Chauvet Cave from the Bradshaw Foundation. Learn more about the Bradshaw Foundation’s work in Chauvet Cave.

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3D Map of Chauvet Cave, from “Cave of Forgotten Dreams” by Werner Herzog (2010)

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“Cave of Forgotten Dreams” was inspired by “First Impressions,” an article written by Judith Thurman for The New Yorker and published in 2008. But she, like the many filmmakers who had also petitioned the French government since Chauvet was discovered in 1994, never got permission to enter the cave and was forced to work from drawings and videos at the site.

Mr. Herzog succeeded where others failed, said Erik Nelson, the film’s producer, by becoming a temporary employee of the French government (for the symbolic payment of 1 euro) and giving France’s Ministry of Culture copies of the raw footage for noncommercial purposes. “I was kind of astounded that Werner got in,” Ms. Thurman said. “Getting permission to film in there was in itself a great feat of cultural diplomacy.” (read the full article, Prehistoric Cave With a Hornet on the Wall by Larry Rohter, on the New York Times)

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Michael Kimmelman | Quote

150 150 Lines & Marks

"Drawing used to be a civilized thing to do, like reading and writing. It was taught in elementary schools. It was democratic. It was a boon to happiness." - Michael Kimmelman

from The New York Times, "An Exhibition About Drawing Conjures a Time When Amateurs Roamed the Earth." [ July 19, 2006 ]
     

Leonardo da Vinci, Anatomical study of a human skull.

The Secret of Drawing | Ep.1, The Line of Enquiry

832 983 Lines & Marks

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“][vc_column width=”1/1″ desktop_hide=”” tablet_width=”” tablet_sm_width=”” mobile_width=””][vc_column_text animation_delay=”200″]This four part BBC series, presented by Andrew Graham-Dixon, explores how drawing has shaped our lives. Ep. 1 looks at artists who have chosen the natural world as their subject matter and explores how drawing has helped man to understand his place in the universe. The programme covers the Renaissance, the Eastern way, Turner, Constable and contemporary artists Anthony Gormley and Richard Long.

The Line of Enquiry
Season 1 | Episode 1
Aired date: 

Andrew Graham-Dixon takes a look at the many ways in which drawing has connected us with the natural world and also how it has helped advance scientific enquiry, from the Italian Renaissance right through to today. In this first edition, he meets a surgeon whose study of Leonardo da Vinci’s drawings of the heart has led him to develop a radical new form of cardiac operation, uncovers a remarkable 200 year-old series of drawings of the moon, and encounters some of the actual preserved birds drawn by the great American ornithologist John James Audubon.

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The Secret of Drawing Series is the property of the BBC and is subject to copyright. Header video is the work of SI Scott.

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Charles Burns Black Hole, Cover #7 (4)

Charles Burns

638 1024 Lines & Marks

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“I wasn’t great at sports, I didn’t have a flamboyant personality, but I could draw.”

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row heading_color=”” section_type=”fullwidth-background” flex_height=”” section_full_height=”no” bg_type=”” bg_image_type=”” pattern_overlay=”” color_overlay=”” opacity_overlay=”10″ header_feature=”” footer_feature=”” desktop_visibility=”” tablet_visibility=”” tablet_sm_visibility=”” mobile_visibility=”” seperator_indeed_locker=”Indeed Social Locker” lk_sl=”” lk_t=”” lk_la=”horizontal” lk_dc=”true” lk_dfn=”true” lk_lt=”2″ lk_etl=”0″ lk_tl=”30″ lk_nru=”0″ lk_rl=”0″ lk_lra=”30″ lk_lrt=”days” lk_io=”” lk_lp=”50″ lk_dm=”0″ lk_thm=”0″ lk_tuo=”0″ lk_dt=” “][vc_column width=”1/1″ desktop_hide=”” tablet_width=”” tablet_sm_width=”” mobile_width=””][dzs_parallaxer media=”https://secureservercdn.net/104.238.71.250/qzx.c30.myftpupload.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/Charles_Burns-Black_Hole7.jpg” clip_height=”650″ total_height=”1000″ mode=”normal” enable_scrollbar=”off” breakout=”off” direction=”normal”][/dzs_parallaxer][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text animation_delay=”200″]”At the juncture of fiction and memory, of cheap thrills and horror, lies the dark world of Charles Burns’ art. His stories, appearing in alternative comics such as Raw since the early 1980s, take comic book clichés — wiseacre kids, sinister scientists and tough-as-nails detectives — and rearrange them into disturbing yet funny patterns. Beneath this interplay of familiar iconography lurks the real traumas of childhood, traumas of loss and alienation.”  (Read more on The Comics Journal)[/vc_column_text][grve_media_box media_type=”image-video-popup” video_link=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vwL6TwdVXFQ” map_lat=”51.516221″ map_lng=”-0.136986″ map_zoom=”14″ map_height=”280″ align=”left” animation_delay=”200″ image=”6338″ title_link=”||”][/grve_media_box][vc_column_text animation_delay=”200″ css=”.vc_custom_1433358802745{margin-top: -28px !important;}”]

Charles Burns, “Fear(s) of the Dark/Peur(s) du noir.” (2007) WARNING: Graphic Content.

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Charles Burns, “Altoids Commercial.” (2005)

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Images courtesy of Adam Baumgold Gallery and are subject to copyright. © Charles Burns.

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Albrecht Dürer, "Young Hare." (1502)

Albrecht Durer

800 884 Lines & Marks

[vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][grve_divider line_type=”space” backtotop_title=”Back to top” padding_top=”25″ padding_bottom=”25″][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][grve_slogan title=”“And since geometry is the right foundation of all painting, I have decided to teach its rudiments and principles to all youngsters eager for art.“” heading=”h1″ line_type=”no-line” button_type=”simple” button_color=”primary-1″ button_size=”extrasmall” button_shape=”square” button2_type=”simple” button2_color=”primary-1″ button2_size=”extrasmall” button2_shape=”square” align=”center” animation=”fadeInDown” animation_delay=”250″ margin_bottom=”75″][/grve_slogan][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row heading_color=”” section_type=”fullwidth-background” flex_height=”” section_full_height=”no” bg_type=”” bg_image_type=”” pattern_overlay=”” color_overlay=”” opacity_overlay=”10″ header_feature=”” footer_feature=”” desktop_visibility=”” tablet_visibility=”” tablet_sm_visibility=”” mobile_visibility=”” seperator_indeed_locker=”Indeed Social Locker” lk_sl=”” lk_t=”” lk_la=”horizontal” lk_dc=”true” lk_dfn=”true” lk_lt=”2″ lk_etl=”0″ lk_tl=”30″ lk_nru=”0″ lk_rl=”0″ lk_lra=”30″ lk_lrt=”days” lk_io=”” lk_lp=”50″ lk_dm=”0″ lk_thm=”0″ lk_tuo=”0″ lk_dt=” “][vc_column width=”1/1″ desktop_hide=”” tablet_width=”” tablet_sm_width=”” mobile_width=””][dzs_parallaxer media=”https://secureservercdn.net/104.238.71.250/qzx.c30.myftpupload.com/wp-content/uploads/albrecht-durer-geomerty.jpg” clip_height=”700″ total_height=”1200″ mode=”normal” enable_scrollbar=”off” breakout=”off” direction=”normal”][/dzs_parallaxer][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text animation_delay=”200″]”A supremely gifted and versatile German artist of the Renaissance period, Albrecht Dürer (1471–1528) was born in the Franconian city of Nuremberg, one of the strongest artistic and commercial centers in Europe during the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. He was a brilliant painter, draftsman, and writer, though his first and probably greatest artistic impact was in the medium of printmaking…” (From the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Vincent Van Gogh, The Drawings)[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row section_type=”in-container” flex_height=”” section_full_height=”no” bg_type=”image” bg_image=”5159″ bg_image_type=”parallax” pattern_overlay=”yes” opacity_overlay=”10″ padding_top=”250″ padding_bottom=”250″ header_feature=”” footer_feature=”” tablet_visibility=”” tablet_sm_visibility=”” mobile_visibility=””][vc_column width=”1/1″][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row heading_color=”” section_type=”fullwidth-background” flex_height=”” section_full_height=”no” bg_type=”” bg_image_type=”” pattern_overlay=”” color_overlay=”” opacity_overlay=”10″ header_feature=”” footer_feature=”” desktop_visibility=”” tablet_visibility=”” tablet_sm_visibility=”” mobile_visibility=”” seperator_indeed_locker=”Indeed Social Locker” lk_sl=”” lk_t=”” lk_la=”horizontal” lk_dc=”true” lk_dfn=”true” lk_lt=”2″ lk_etl=”0″ lk_tl=”30″ lk_nru=”0″ lk_rl=”0″ lk_lra=”30″ lk_lrt=”days” lk_io=”” lk_lp=”50″ lk_dm=”0″ lk_thm=”0″ lk_tuo=”0″ lk_dt=” “][vc_column width=”1/1″ desktop_hide=”” tablet_width=”” tablet_sm_width=”” mobile_width=””][vc_column_text animation_delay=”200″]

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