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November 2015

Ernst Haeckel, Specimen of radiolaria (a type of marine Protozoa)

Ernst Haeckel

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Ernst Haeckel (1834-1919) was a German scientist and artist who discovered thousands of new species, described and named life forms, invented biology terms and wrote numerous scientific studies during his lifetime. He is best known for his beautiful illustrations ranging from micro-organisms to human genealogical trees. In the 1850s, just after cell theory had been formulated, he was one of many students excited to make discoveries in a field that wasn’t yet fully developed, though he soon became dissatisfied with what felt like an unfulfilling scientific practice. In the late 1870s, however, while looking through a microscope at grains of sand, Haeckel began to sketch the mineral-shell specimens called radiolarians. It was through these drawings that his passion for science was reignited and he set out to map every type of marine life, seeing radiolarians as a “key to the creative power of nature.” 

Ernst Haeckel, Various species of Siphonophoral (in the same class as hydras).
Ernst Haeckel, Specimen of red algae (Rhodophyceae).

Haecklel’s meticulous drawings gave a visual power to Darwin’s theory, helping him defend and spread his work. In 1868, his illustrated findings became a bestselling book entitled Natürliche Schöpfungsgeschichte.  It was translated to English in 1876 as The History of Creation. But years of struggle also haunted Haeckel – he was subjected to harsh criticism by his scientific colleges of the time as he tried to integrate artistic and scientific practices. Even so, his scientific and artistic output was so extensive and prolific that even Darwin credited him in The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex, saying that if Natürliche Schöpfungsgeschichte “had appeared before my essay had been written, I should probably never have completed it.” (wiki)

“Proteus: A Nineteenth Century Vision, by Director David Lebrun, 2004”
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The images on this page are not authored by Lines & Marks. They are shared under “fair use” for non-profit, educational and reference purposes, and may be subject to copyright. If for any reason this status is contested, notify us and we will remove the image(s) immediately. All other, © Lines & Marks, 2015.

Blu | MUTO – Wall Painted Animation

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A short street-art film by Blu. An ambiguous animation painted on public walls. Made in Buenos Aires and in Baden (fantoche).

blublu.org
Music by Andrea Martignoni
Produced by Mercurio Film
Assistant: Sibe

Blu is the pseudonym of an Italian artist who conceals his real identity. He was born in Senigallia. He lives in Bologna and has been active in street art since 1999. Blu’s fame began in 1999, thanks to a series of illicit graffiti painted in the historical center and suburbs of Bologna, the capital of Italy’s Emilia-Romagna region. In the early years of his career his technique was limited to the use of spray paint, the typical medium of graffiti culture. His characteristic style appeared in 2001, however, when Blu started painting with house paint, using rollers mounted on top of telescopic sticks. This new solution allowed him to increase the painted surface area and convey a stronger intensity to his visual vocabulary. Huge human figures, sometimes sarcastic, sometimes dramatic, who looked as if they were borrowed from comics or arcade games, began appearing along the streets of Bologna around this time. (wiki)

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Hideki Inaba ( 稲葉 秀樹 ) | “Slowly Rising”

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“Slowly Rising,” directed by Hideki Inaba is the official music video for BEATSOFREEN. Hideki Inaba was born in 1988 and is from Tokyo, Japan. He favorite pastime, besides making animation is insect collecting.

Header video is called, “hadopelagic” and can be found on his vimeo page.

“‘Slowly Rising’ suggested to me the image of the sun. A seed was born beneath the sun, the source of all existence. The seed absorbed the light. It created more seeds like itself, gradually increasing in number. Time passed, but still their numbers slowly continued to rise, and before long they were quietly swallowed up by their own shadows. After everything that had lived had perished, nothing but an empty world remained. There, once again, an environment where the next living things could grow silently began to spread.” — Hideki Inaba

Hideki Inaba
vimeo.com/kanahebi
tumblr.com/blog/kanahebi1783

“Slowly Rising” was mastered by Matthewdavid
www.leavingrecords.com

More from Beatsofreen
soundcloud.com/beatsofreen
kingdeluxe.ca/beatsofreen

“Slowly Rising” is included in album Full Circle by King Deluxe
kingdeluxe.ca
vimeo.com/channels/kingdeluxe

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James Gillray, "The Plumb Pudding in Danger."

The Secret of Drawing | Ep.2, Storylines

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This four part BBC series, presented by Andrew Graham-Dixon, explores how drawing has shaped our lives.

Storylines
Season 1 | Episode 2
Aired date: 

Episode 2 – Storylines
Andrew Graham-Dixon examines the variety of ways in which drawing has been used throughout the centuries to tell narrative stories, many of them dark or satirical, from animation to Japanese manga books. Political cartoonist Martin Rowson explains how his savage commentaries on contemporary politicians are influenced by 19th century masters Hogarth and Gillray, and in a rare interview the American comic strip artist Daniel Clowes talks about what inspired his celebrated graphic novel Ghost World. Also covered is Manga artist Misako Rocks!, Hollywood storyboard artist, J. Todd Anderson, early animator, Winsor McCay and French animator Sylvain Chomet.

The Secret of Drawing Series is the property of the BBC and is subject to copyright. Header video is the work of SI Scott.

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